More trouble for online schools

While there are many good ideas in education reform, the education system in the US is experiencing growing pains as it attempts to enter and keep up with the digital world. Maine is the latest state to say no to subcontracting its online schooling with K12. I just discovered an article from earlier this month, Maine denied applications from both K12 and Connections Academy to run public school online programs in that state.

In regards to K12’s application, Amy Carlisle, president of the local board for the proposed Maine Virtual Academy had this to say about her board:

“She also vigorously denied that her board lacked independence from K12 Inc., the Herndon, Va., based online education company that would manage the school, hire and fire its staff and headmaster, and provide curricular materials and assessment data.”

Now if K12 is in charge of major decisions regarding the school including all staffing decisions (including hiring and firing), school management, provides curriculum, and assessment (testing) data, that to me says K12 is pretty much in charge of the school instead of the board.  As a result,

“The charter commission denied the school’s application in a unanimous vote Tuesday, saying that its review team “has no confidence that the governing board of the Maine Virtual Academy can functionally manage the daily education and fiscal responsibilities without staff.”

So what if the board is independent if they are not the ones who actually are managing the school program? They are contracting the work out to K12. This is the second year the board’s application has been denied. Last year was for similar oversight concerns regarding K12. Maine created a law authorizing online public education in 2011.

Good for Maine for not handing over control over the state’s education to big business, especially since their track record is proving less than desirable outcomes for students in other states. However, students should have education options. We just need to find a good balance that takes into account service, cost, and what’s going to have the best outcome for students.

I consider K12 education’s version of the agriculture and food giant Monsanto. Starting small and inconspicuously, they now control a vast majority of all phases of farming and food production in the US and Canada with products ranging  everything from seeds (including many GMO varieties), herbicides like Roundup, pesticides, to mills, and factories. Yes, they do offer useful products, but taken as a whole, they have too much control over a vital industry.

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2 Responses

  1. The K12 run schools also have unreasonable expectations for teachers. It is difficult for a teacher to get a full time gig but they are required to be available for contact 5-6 days a week.

  2. I’ve heard that they consider their contracts part time yet expect full time availability. They claim it’s because you are just on-call instead of actually working all of the time.

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